Friday, August 21, 2015

Inspect Home before Selling | Professional Building Inspections Perth

Posted By:Peter Huber
Before You Sell Your Home, Have it Inspected!

So you’re considering selling your home and now you want to be sure that there will be no unpleasant surprises to upset the settlement process. Well, we’re here to help make sure of that! Building and Home Inspection Service currently has five offices spread around the wider Perth metropolitan area, all of which draw on a wealth of experience to ensure that your home is thoroughly inspected with the most up-to-date equipment and reports digitally collated for your future reference.

Professional Building Inspections Perth
Common Problems with Building Integrity

1) Termite Infestation and Damage

This is one problem you never want to let get out of hand. Termites just love untreated pine and will turn structural timbers to dust in months if left unchecked. We will endeavor to find their trails, any timber that has been affected from ceiling supports to floor joists, and record all the sites photographically and in your written report.

2) Foundation Settling

A common problem with suspended houses – those on stumps – but also on concrete slab foundations are cracks that appear as a house settles, or as the ground dries out or becomes wetter over years. Cosmetic or structural repairs are called for, but in terms of selling your home, so long as the issue is catalogued, no-one can complain they didn’t know what they were buying.

Professional Building Inspections Perth
The movement of buildings can also result in problems with main lines in and out of the structure. While electricity and gas are not usually a problem, due to the malleability of the materials used, even modern day PVC pipes are susceptible to fracture. This can result in leakage from waste pipes wherever the connection becomes stressed – even in the wall cavity of your home.

3) Construction Short-cuts

We don’t want to seem overly critical, but even the width of mortar joins between bricks must meet a minimum standard – too much mortar compromises the structural integrity of the wall. Elsewhere, poorly secured flooring can result in buckling of verandah floors, or the use of untreated or uncured, water-sensitive wood close to down-pipes can result in much the same thing.

Professional Building Inspections Perth
All these and many, many more criteria are examined and checked with a Building Inspection reports Perth – there is one for your budget and building, no matter where in Perth you are located. Call one of our offices today! or else go

Friday, August 14, 2015

What causes condensation in houses? | Building Inspection specialists Perth


What Causes condensation?

Building Inspection specialists Perth:
When moist air is cooled below its “dew” point that is (cooled to temperature at which it cannot contain all the water originally present) and if the cooling is caused by contact with a colder surface, then the surplus water appears as droplets on that surface, we call this condensation.

In real every day analogy it translate like this:- we hardly notice the air around us on an average day, then night time approaches, the temperature drops, and things become cold as the temperature drops, so does the air, if this dropping in temperature continues then the water vapour that occurs naturally in the air turns into water and if cold enough into ice.

Air in a house can become moister because the occupants and some appliances produce water vapor. Typical quantities of water vapor produced in a home are:-

    Adults breathing 0.1 liters/hr
    Hot Bath 1.5 liters/hr
    Washing Machine 3.0 liters/hr
    Clothes Drier 5.0 liters/hr
    Hot Shower 10.0 liters/hr

Water vapor is also generated in large quantities by gas stoves/hot plates and kerosene heaters so much so that a lot of water may be stored in the air each day as water vapour.

Building Inspection specialists Perth:
On cold days much of this water will condense (if the ventilation rate is low) on cold window panes and even on walls. Little wonder then when some house holders complain of mold, decay and damp carpets.

Steam coming from service areas such as kitchens laundries and bathrooms travel to other rooms in the house, even if these rooms are a considerable distance away. The worst condensation problems generally occur in unheated rooms facing south which receive little heat from the sun. The movement of the water vapour within the air (using the air as a travel medium) travelling from service areas to other rooms such as bedrooms is due to the difference in water vapour pressure.

Condensation in new homes

Severe condensation problems often occur in new homes as construction moisture is stored in the bricks floor etc. in addition to the moisture generated by the occupants. It will take about six to 12 months for the water to evaporate. Some of this moisture will be lost to the outside air by natural ventilation and much will find its way into other rooms in the house.

Building Inspection specialists Perth:

If moist air from the rooms is exhausted into the roof space, sever condensation may occur within the roof space causing costly damage to ceilings, roof members and insulation materials.

    Poorly vented pitched tiled roofs with aluminium foil sarking directly beneath the tiles. To reduce the risk of condensation, ventilation should be provided in the eaves and gable ends.
    Flat metal deck or cathedral roofs. On no account should moist air be exhausted into these roof spaces. It should be carried by flues passing right through the roof space (or external walls) to the outside air. Sever condensation could also occur if such roof spaces were connected via wall cavities to a moist sub-floor space.

Technical information by courtesy of CSIRO.
For now till next week when we will discuss
your “Handy Jock”.

Building Inspection specialists Perth:
Any questions that our readers may have would be gladly welcomed and endeavored to be answered as seen fit

Do you What causes condensation in houses? Condensation problems often occur in new homes as construction moisture is stored in the bricks floor etc. in addition to the moisture generated by the occupants. So Call 08 9331 3031 for Home Inspections reports Perth  and Building Inspection reports Perth for complete home solution.

Monday, August 10, 2015

Building Inspections reports Perth | Improving Sub-Floor Ventilation

By: Peter Huber
Posted By:

Improving Sub-Floor Ventilation

We will look at improving sub-floor ventilation which if not done correctly can be a cause of decay to timber components.

The other day we were asked to inspect an older style home in Nedlands it was a grand old mansion with timber flooring through out, massive ceilings space and it was oozing with old world charm. Generally the home was in good shape some of the roof timber were showings signs of sag and ageing but one room in particular was extremely cold, and it almost reminded me of the spooky stories one reads about cold rooms in haunted homes, but no such luck.
It turned out, after removing the inspection (male/female) opening in between the floor joists, it was obvious why the room was so cold.

Building Inspections reports Perth:

For starters the distance between the ground and the floor was very close, the home was on a sloped block, and sub-floor ventilation was minimal. I will insert some data facts as supplied by CSIRO to us, on how to improve the subfloor ventilation with some interesting and commonsense applications, but you may well ask what has a sloping block to do with it, well when water via rain is deposited around the perimeter of a house if the home sits on a flat block of land the water will seep into the ground vertically down, if the block is sloped the water that may pond in areas can and will flow down the hill and seep into the ground as it progresses down the incline of the land and hence we get damp and moisture under areas that would mot normally get damp on a level block.

Now the CSIRO Division receives an steady stream of requests for advise on prevention and correction of decay in flooring and in the majority of cases the problem is one of inadequate subfloor ventilation, that is for a free flow of air under all parts of suspended timber floors.

In older buildings the problem can be complicated by an ineffective dam-proof course, by leakages from water supplies or wastes or by the discharge of storm water into the sub-floor cavity, further more in older buildings the provisions for under-floor ventilation is often inadequate.

Building Inspections reports Perth:

We shall take a case in point, where in a double brick dwelling circa(1920) most of the timber flooring had to be renewed. During the repairs the size and numbers of openings in the brickwork below floor level was increased because, with a few exceptions, the only provisions originally provided for ventilation was the openings in the brick work beneath the doorways. Before the new flooring was laid, extra openings were provided within one(1) to two(2) meters of every corner of every room and midway along any wall over five(5) meters long. Each of the new openings occupied the space of at least two bricks.

In addition because of the low sub-floor clearance and the difficulty of providing good cross ventilation, plastic sheeting was spread out over the ground and under all new flooring so as to reduce the area from which soil moisture could evaporate into the sub-floor cavity. Mortar droppings and other debris were removed from the inside of all external ventilator openings and finally the ventilators themselves were replaced.

Replacement of the ventilators was an essential part of the repairs. Surprisingly the smaller of the original terracotta vents provided for rather more free airway than the double brick size, even though the latter had one more opening. However in practice, nether allowed for much air exchange between the subfloor space and the outside because the openings had been blocked by spiders and assorted debris. The pressed metal vents that were used to replace the original terra-cotta air bricks allow for about ten(10) times as much air flow through each opening. This together with the other measures taken should ensure that conditions conducive to decay do not develop again under that floor.

Adequate subfloor ventilation is also an essential requirement which is often overlooked when remedying the problem of excessive dampness in walls, by effectively ventilating all subfloor cavities, moisture that evaporates from the soil or the foundation is removed and the sub-floor humidity is prevented from rising. However achieving an airflow across or along the sub-floor space can be difficult in some houses, especially in terraces where there can be problems in providing vents at both ends of the house.

Building Inspections reports Perth:

In case like that the Division often recommends the utilisation of disused fireplaces as a means of venting. If decorative facing is placed over the front of a fireplace openings cut through the hearth to the sub-floor space and a cowling or chimney pot placed on top of the chimney then a n up-draught will be created when the wind blows over the roof and air will be drawn from under the floor.

Any questions that our readers may have would be gladly welcomed and endeavoured to be answered as seen fit.